How Much Do Roofers Make Per Hour?

by Leyla Norman; Updated September 26, 2017
Roof Sheet

Roofing is less susceptible to swings in the economy than most construction-related trades. This is because much of the business consists of repairing and replacing roofs on existing buildings. Between 2012 and 2022, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics expects the number of jobs for roofers to increase 11 percent, similar to the average of all jobs. A high turnover rate in the profession is expected to open up additional jobs.

National Pay

The average hourly wage for a roofer was $18.65 as of May 2013, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The median hourly wage was $17.08, and those at the 90th percentile earned $28.51 per hour. The average annual salary for a roofer was $38,790, while the median annual salary was $35,520.

Industry Wages

State government paid the highest wage to roofers of any industry in 2013, according to the BLS: $27.55 per hour on average, or $57,300 per year. Roofers working for the federal executive branch earned the second-highest pay of $27.00 per hour, or $56,160 each year. Foundation, structure and building exterior contractors employed the most roofers, however, and paid an average of $18.55 per hour, or $38,580 per year. Other major employers included residential building construction, paying an average of $17.16 per hour, or $35,680 per year, and nonresidential building construction, paying an average of $22.73 per hour, or $47,280 annually. Roofers working for building finishing contractors averaged $20.04 hourly, or an annual income of $41,680.

State Salaries

Florida had the highest concentration of roofers in the U.S. as of 2013, but roofers in Alaska earned the most at $28.46 per hour, according to the BLS. The District of Columbia had higher wages than the remaining states -- an average of $24.63 per hour. Hawaii came next among the states, paying roofers $24.50 per hour on average. Among other states with top wages, Minnesota reported wages for roofers averaging $24.34 per hour, and Massachusetts reported $24.07 hourly on average.

City Earnings

Palm Coast, Florida, was home to the highest concentration of roofers in U.S. cities as of 2013, according to the BLS . The combined region of Atlantic City-Hammonton, New Jersey, paid them the best, though, at $31.46 per hour, making their annual salary $65,430. The second-highest was New Haven, Connecticut, which reported average pay of $28,53 per hour, followed by Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin, reporting an average hourly wage of $26.92. Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin came fourth, showing average roofing wages of $26.74 per hour.

2016 Salary Information for Roofers

Roofers earned a median annual salary of $37,760 in 2016, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. On the low end, roofers earned a 25th percentile salary of $30,110, meaning 75 percent earned more than this amount. The 75th percentile salary is $49,980, meaning 25 percent earn more. In 2016, 146,200 people were employed in the U.S. as roofers.

About the Author

Leyla Norman has been a writer since 2008 and is a certified English as a second language teacher. She also has a master's degree in development studies and a Bachelor of Arts in anthropology.

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