Job Benefits for Newspaper Journalists

by Luanne Kelchner; Updated September 26, 2017

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, competition for journalists on national and metropolitan newspapers is high. The median earnings for newspaper journalists in 2008 were $33,430. In addition to an annual salary, newspaper journalists enjoy some benefits as well. The work schedule and environment can be chaotic and stressful for journalists facing deadlines. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that most employers for news journalists require a bachelor’s degree in journalism or communication to qualify for a position.

Travel

Some newspaper journalists must travel to cover different areas of the world. While the journalist does not have the choice for the location of his assignments and must work while visiting different parts of the world, the career does provide the ability to experience different regions and cultures. However, for news journalists with families, traveling away from home may be a burden.

Access

Newspaper journalists can gain access to exclusive events, meet and interview celebrities and interesting people and witness history firsthand. To bring new stories and information to the public, the news journalist has an opportunity to learn about the world and share that information with others. While the hours may be long and the schedule chaotic, the ability to witness great events provides an incentive for some newspaper journalists.

Independent Work Environment

While covering news events and stories, the news journalist can work independently. A news journalist does work under the direction of an editor, but the duties of the job such as investigating leads, interviewing and writing news stories are independent activities. Journalists may also work together with other journalists and photographers on assignments.

Time Off, Overtime, Insurance and Retirement

The benefits for a news journalist also include paid time off such as sick days and vacations. Journalists may work long hours on assignments, which provides overtime pay, according to the California Employment Development Department. News journalists may also earn additional pay for work on a night shift schedule. Newspapers may provide the journalist with health insurance and retirement plans.

About the Author

Luanne Kelchner works out of Daytona Beach, Florida and has been freelance writing full time since 2008. Her ghostwriting work has covered a variety of topics but mainly focuses on health and home improvement articles. Kelchner has a degree from Southern New Hampshire University in English language and literature.