How Much do High School Assistant Coaches Make?

Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images

High school assistant coaches guide student athletes to help develop their skills in a variety of sports, including football, soccer, baseball, basketball, volleyball and others. They work with both male and female student athletes. High school assistant coaches fall under the broader career category of "coaches and scouts," who earned a mean salary of $35,950 in 2010, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Basic Salary Information

The median annual salary for coaches and scouts in 2010 was $28,340, according to the BLS. The lowest-paid 10th percentile earned $16,380 or less, while those in the 25th percentile earned $18,800 or less. The highest-paid 75th percentile earned $43,930 or more, while the highest-paid 90th percentile earned an annual salary of $63,720 or more. According to the Women Sports Jobs website, high school assistant coaches typically earn between $20,000 and $50,000 a year, depending on the school, the assistant coach's education level and whether the assistant coach holds other positions at the school.

Salary by Industry

Coaches and scouts earn varying salaries based on the industry in which they work. According to the BLS, coaches and scouts in elementary and secondary schools, which includes high school assistant coaches, earned a mean annual salary of $32,110 in 2010. Coaches in other schools and instruction institutions earned a mean annual salary of $29,330, while those at colleges, universities or professional schools earned a mean salary of $49,140 in 2010.

Teaching

Many high school coaches, including assistant coaches, are also teachers at the school who coach part time to earn extra money, according to the BLS. Teacher salaries vary widely based on experience and school district. According to the BLS, teachers at elementary, middle and secondary schools, which includes high schools, earned a median salary range between $47,100 and $51,180 in 2008.

Job Outlook

According to the BLS, the job outlook for coaches and scouts, including high school assistant coaches, is positive, with a 25 percent increase in job opportunities predicted between 2008 and 2018. Those with teacher certification have a better chance of getting a job teaching and coaching at a high school. Also, prospective assistant coaches will have more job opportunities and less competition finding assistant coaching jobs in women's high school sports. Assistant coaches for high school teams also have the opportunity to advance to head coaches, or to advance to coaching positions at the college level. Comparatively, umpires, referees and other sports officials have a 10 percent job growth rate expected during the same decade.

References

Resources

About the Author

Chris Newton has worked as a professional writer since 2001. He spent two years writing software specifications then spent three years as a technical writer for Microsoft before turning to copywriting for software and e-commerce companies. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in English and creative writing from the University of Colorado.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images