How to Become a Restaurant Consultant

by Danny Donahue; Updated September 26, 2017
Empty glasses in restaurant

The majority of new restaurants fail within the first few years due to a lack of funding, experience or both. The ambiance and the food must suit the clientele. Inexperienced restaurant owners have no way of learning these facts without proper guidance. As a restaurant consultant, you can give owners and managers the training they need to succeed. But before becoming a consultant you must first learn the business from the bottom up. Working in various restaurants and learning the tricks of the trade will give you the knowledge you need to teach your clients to succeed.

Step 1

Get a job and gain experience as a line cook. Learn everything you can about preparing food, food storage and how a professional kitchen runs.

Step 2

Work as a server in several types of restaurants. Pay close attention to the clientele drawn to each type of restaurant, the decor in each as well as the location. Remember which combinations worked well together and which did not.

Step 3

Work your way up to restaurant management in at least one establishment. Draw on your experience as a cook and a server to help you raise your restaurant's status until it is as successful as possible.

Step 4

Take business classes in pursuit of a degree in management, finances or accounting. Take daytime classes so you can spend your evenings getting hands-on experience in the industry.

Step 5

Obtain a business license as a restaurant consultant. Contact local restaurant owners and managers to get clients.

Step 6

Spend as much time with each client as necessary to form an accurate opinion of the business. Make a detailed report or take the hands-on approach and be on-site while you guide the client through the rebuilding process.

About the Author

After learning electronics in the U.S. Navy in the 1980s, Danny Donahue spent a lifetime in the construction industry. He has worked with some of the finest construction talent in the Southeastern United States. Donahue has been a freelance writer since 2008, focusing his efforts on his beloved construction projects.

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