How to Become a Certified Notary & Wedding Officiant

by Lainie Petersen; Updated September 26, 2017

Only three states, South Carolina, Maine and Florida, permit notaries to officiate at weddings. The process to become a notary is different in each state. If you are interested in becoming a notary and wedding officiant, you need to complete the application process established in your jurisdiction.

Become a Notary in Florida

Step 1

Complete the required three-hour notary education course through a provider approved by the Florida governor's office. A listing of approved providers is available through the governor's website on the "How to Become a Notary" page.

Step 2

Obtain a list of approved notary bonding agencies from the Florida Division of Corporations website. Select a bonding agency and follow its instructions to complete your application. Your bonding agency will electronically submit your application on your behalf.

Step 3

Wait to receive your commission certificate from your bonding agency. Your bonding agency also typically provides you with your notary seal.

Become a Notary in Maine

Step 1

Visit the Maine Secretary of State's Division of Corporations, UCC and Commissions website and download the Application for Appointment as a Maine Notary Public. Any adult resident of Maine can apply to become a notary providing that she meets Maine's legal requirements for notaries. Residents of New Hampshire who are employed or run a business in Maine can also apply to be a notary. There are separate applications for Maine and New Hampshire residents, so be sure to select the right application.

Step 2

Complete the application, which includes an open book examination on notary law and procedures. The secretary of state's office considers your performance on the examination when evaluating your application.

Step 3

Ask a registered voter in Maine to endorse your application to become a notary. He will have to complete a short form that is part of your application packet.

Step 4

Bring your application to the municipal clerk/registrar of voters in your area and ask her to verify that you are a resident.

Step 5

Sign your application and have your signature notarized.

Step 6

Mail the application, along with your application fee, to the address printed on the application.

Step 7

Wait for your application to be processed. If you are appointed as a notary public, you must be sworn into office by a dedimus Justice, a Maine public official who administers the oath of office to other public officials. You will be informed of your appointment by mail, and this letter will tell you how to arrange to be sworn into office.

Become a Notary in South Carolina

Step 1

Download the application to become a notary public and the "South Carolina Notary Public Reference Manual" from the South Carolina secretary of state's website. Read these materials to ensure that you meet the requirements to become a notary public in South Carolina.

Step 2

Complete the application, have it notarized and attach a check or money order to cover your application fee.

Step 3

Send the completed application to the office of your county's legislative delegation. The application includes list of legislative delegations and their addresses. If the list does not include an address for your county's delegation office, you must send the application to the South Carolina House of Representatives. Your application must be signed by either your state senator and representative, your legislative delegation's chairman or secretary, or half of the present delegates. The legislative delegation or your elected officials will forward your application to the secretary of state.

Step 4

Wait to receive your commission notification from the secretary of state.

About the Author

Lainie Petersen writes about business, real estate and personal finance, drawing on 25 years experience in publishing and education. Petersen's work appears in Money Crashers, Selling to the Masses, and in Walmart News Now, a blog for Walmart suppliers. She holds a master's degree in library science from Dominican University.