Casio PCR-260 Instructions

by Patrick Nelson; Updated September 26, 2017
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The Casio PCR-260 electronic cash register features 10 product departments, 100 price look-ups (PLU), automatic tax calculations and a calculator function. Once you have positioned the cash register on a flat, stable surface you can initialize the device, plug it in, load the paper roll and perform some quick start programming, which includes setting the time and date and conducting some transactions. The device can also produce daily transaction reports.

Items you will need

  • 3 "AA" batteries
  • Scissors
Step 1

Set the “Mode” switch to the “Off” position and plug the cash register into the power outlet. Load the memory protection batteries by installing them under the printer cover, and load a roll of journal paper by inserting it into the holder and cutting the leading edge so it inserts into the slot. Press the “Feed” key to feed the paper into the printer and replace the cover. Load the receipt paper using the same procedure.

Step 2

Turn the “Mode” switch to the “PGM” position and set the current time and date. Set the time by pressing the “1” key and “Sub Total,” then enter the time in a 24-hour format. Set the tax rate with the “3” and “Sub Total” keys. Refer to the tax tables in the Casio User Guide, which is listed in the References section below. For example, set Colorado state tax to 5.25 percent by entering “0225” to program the set code for Tax Table 2, then press “Sub Total.” Enter “5.25” and “=CA/AMT TEND,” then “5002” for 50 round off and 02 for add on, and press “Sub Total” to end the programming.

Step 3

Turn the “Mode” switch to “REG” and perform a basic sales operation. For example, enter “100” for a unit price of $1.00, and “6/+1” for Department One. Then enter “#Dept/Shift” and “200” for a second unit price of $2.00, followed by “10/5” for Department 10. Press “Sub Total” and “500” for the cash tendered, for instance, $5.00. The receipt shows the transaction figures including the total due, tax on the two items and indicates the change due.

About the Author

Patrick Nelson has been a professional writer since 1992. He was editor and publisher of the music industry trade publication "Producer Report" and has written for a number of technology blogs. Nelson studied design at Hornsey Art School.

Photo Credits

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