How to Become a Laughter Therapist

by Clayton Browne; Updated September 26, 2017

Laughter therapy encourages the natural physiological process of laughter to help deal with difficult emotions like fear, anger and worry and the resulting stress. Laughter therapists are nearly always degreed and licensed psychologists or psychotherapists. All psychologists have at least an undergraduate degree in psychology, and many have advanced degrees like licensed professional counselor (LPC), licensed clinical social worker (LCSW) or licensed master social worker (LMSW).

Step 1

Earn a bachelor’s degree in psychology. Make sure to take classes in alternative therapy modalities or laughter therapy, if offered. Consider a senior project or undergraduate thesis in the field of laughter therapy.

Step 2

Apply for a license to practice psychology in your state. All states require psychologists to get registered to practice.

Step 3

Find a practicing laughter therapist willing to take you on as an intern or even a junior partner. You might need to practice as a traditional therapist for a few years to build up your reputation and clientele.

Step 4

Enroll in any laughter therapy-related workshops and seminars in your area to stay abreast of the latest developments in the field.

Step 5

Set up your own private practice in laughter therapy, or join an existing therapist partnership group, after you have established yourself as a skillful and trustworthy therapist.

Tips

  • Strongly consider getting a graduate degree or another professional certification in psychology. Having additional credentials makes it much easier to establish a reputation as a practitioner of alternative treatments such as laughter therapy.

About the Author

Clayton Browne has been writing professionally since 1994. He has written and edited everything from science fiction to semiconductor patents to dissertations in linguistics, having worked for Holt, Rinehart & Winston, Steck-Vaughn and The Psychological Corp. Browne has a Master of Science in linguistic anthropology from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.