How to Become a Bible Teacher

by Jared Lewis - Updated September 26, 2017
The Bible is the subject of study in some Christian classrooms.

Teachers educate students for the future and inspire them to continue the learning process. Christian schools sometimes hire teachers who are specifically trained to teach in the area of biblical studies. There are two different levels of professional bible teachers: those at the secondary level and those who serve as professors at the collegiate level. Although these teachers provide instruction at different levels, they obtain their positions through a similar process.

Research colleges to determine which one offers a degree program to best meet your needs. To become a teacher at the secondary education level, you will need a bachelor's degree. Teaching at a college or university will require a master's degree. Things to consider when researching schools include: whether or not they have state-approved teacher education programs, if they have degree programs in biblical studies and do they offer double majors.

Apply to the schools that best meet your needs. Apply to more than one school to increase the likelihood that you will get accepted to at least one of them. Decide which school you will attend.

Pursue a bachelor's degree. You can pursue a bachelor's degree in biblical studies, but keep in mind the fact that many Christian secondary schools seek teachers with state-issued licenses and certificates. You will be better served to pursue a bachelor's degree in education or a field of study in which you can be certified. Pursuing a degree in history or social studies education will likely provide you more opportunities to serve as a Bible teacher. You may also be able to pursue a double major and obtain a degree in both education and biblical studies. Some schools make it possible to do this with only one extra year of study.

Apply for certification in the state where you plan to teach. Certification is the process whereby your state determines that you have met all of the necessary qualifications needed to become a teacher. In most states, the requirements for certification include the completion of a state-approved teacher education program and passing scores on all state mandated certification exams. States vary on the number of certification exams that are required. One to three exams is the typical range required. These exams test your knowledge of the field in which you intend to teach, as well as your knowledge of teaching theory and other professional teaching skills.

Complete a master's degree or doctorate degree if you intend to teach at the college or graduate school level. Master's and doctoral programs in biblical studies typically stress learning to read the biblical texts in the original Hebrew and Greek languages. Other areas often covered by these degree programs include Christian history, theological studies and studies in specific books within the Bible.

2016 Salary Information for Postsecondary Teachers

Postsecondary teachers earned a median annual salary of $78,050 in 2016, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. On the low end, postsecondary teachers earned a 25th percentile salary of $54,710, meaning 75 percent earned more than this amount. The 75th percentile salary is $114,710, meaning 25 percent earn more. In 2016, 1,314,500 people were employed in the U.S. as postsecondary teachers.

About the Author

Jared Lewis is a professor of history, philosophy and the humanities. He has taught various courses in these fields since 2001. A former licensed financial adviser, he now works as a writer and has published numerous articles on education and business. He holds a bachelor's degree in history, a master's degree in theology and has completed doctoral work in American history.

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