How to Become an Insurance Broker in Pennsylvania

by Stephen Hicks; Updated September 26, 2017
Pennsylvania insurance brokers must be licensed by the state.

A career brokering insurance policies might be right for you if you enjoy helping people and businesses protect their assets and manage their risks. In Pennsylvania, brokers must first obtain a license from the state. Typically, you need a property and casualty license for products like auto and homeowner's insurance, and a life, accident and health license for life and health insurance. To become licensed, you must attend mandatory classes, get fingerprinted and pass a state exam. After you receive your license, you can sell policies from any insurance company that agrees to sell its products through your brokerage.

Step 1

Enroll for your classes at an approved education provider using Sircon, the state's authorized course locator. As of November, 2010, you must complete 24 hours of coursework for both the property and casualty class as well as the life, accident and health class. You will receive a certificate of completion for each course.

Step 2

Schedule your insurance exam with Prometric, the state's official exam provider. You must also pay the exam fee at this time. As of November, 2010, fees for producer (broker) exams are either $44 or $55 depending on which exam you need. You must also pay a $20 fingerprint processing fee at this time.

Step 3

Arrive at the testing center you choose at least 30 minutes before the start of the exam. Bring the certificate of completion you received from the prelicense education class, as well as a government-issued form of identification.

Step 4

Pass the exam. Once you pass, immediately apply for your insurance license and submit your fingerprints electronically at a kiosk located at the testing center. You must also pay more fees at this time. As of November, 2010, you must pay a $55 licensing fee, a $12.50 processing fee and a $39 fingerprinting fee. Pay these fees by credit card.

Step 5

Print your license after it is issued by the state. You are now an insurance broker and can begin contacting insurers to sell their products.

Tips

  • If you must take more than one exam, you may be able to schedule both exams for the same day.

Warnings

  • You must pay a $40 rescheduling fee if you are late for your exam or miss it for any reason.

About the Author

Stephen Hicks has been writing professionally since 2000. He recently published his first novel, "The Seventh Day of Christmas." He spent three years as a licensed life and property/casualty insurance agent in California. Hicks holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts in cinema studies from New York University.

Photo Credits

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