How to Become a Sewing Machine Distributor

by Patricia Smith Michaels; Updated September 26, 2017
Professional-style sewing machine

Starting a business as a sewing machine distributor takes research, an initial investment in machinery and the knowledge of running a business. Sewing machines are manufactured domestically or abroad in addition to being of amateur or professional grade. These factors greatly affect the cost of the sewing machine. Running a successful sewing machine business requires extensive knowledge of the machines being sold and the customer market.

Items you will need

  • Sewing machine company
  • Warehouse
  • Business permit
  • Start-up funds
Step 1

Select a brand of sewing machine to sell. Research the company, its reputation and the various models of sewing machines it manufactures.

Step 2

Contact the sewing machine company to apply for its dealer program.

Step 3

Buy or rent a warehouse to store and distribute the sewing machines.

Step 4

Apply for a business permit license and permit in your state and town. Contact your state's chamber of commerce or Secretary of State department for paperwork.

Step 5

Create a start-up budget for the purchase of the sewing machines and related expenses, such as rent and administrative and marketing costs.

Step 6

Purchase an initial stock of sewing machines for the business. The number of machines depends on the budget, type of machine and the number of models you plan to sell.

Step 7

Market your business in local media outlets such as newspapers, yellow pages or the Internet.

Tips

  • The cost of sewing machines depends on the features and the company. For instance, amateur sewing machines with fewer stitiches are generally less expensive than professional-grade machines. Also, machines made in Europe tend to be more expensive than American machines. So, compare companies and products before purchasing.

References

About the Author

Patricia Smith Michaels has been writing business and technology articles online since 2010. She has written instructional manuals and white papers for corporations and has more than 20 years of experience as a researcher and consultant in the areas of health care, education and management. She holds a Master of Business Administration in management and a Bachelor of Science in computers from St. John's University.

Photo Credits

  • sewing machine image by Peter Baxter from Fotolia.com