How to Become a Registered Agent for Corporations

by George Lawrence J.D.; Updated September 26, 2017

State corporation law requires companies, such as corporations and limited liability companies, to have a “registered agent.” The registered agent is responsible for receiving important documents and information on behalf of the company. When the state issues tax materials for the year, they are sent to the corporation’s registered agent. If the corporation is sued, process can be served on the registered agent. If you want to act as a registered agent for corporations, you can offer your own services or look for employment from a registered agent service company.

Step 1

Meet your state’s residency requirements. Typically, you must have a home or business in that state and you must be physically present in that state for the majority of the year.

Step 2

Lease or purchase office space open to the public. According to Biz Filings, registered agents must have an address that is publicly accessible. The address cannot be a post office box.

Step 3

Advertise your services to entrepreneurs and operate as a freelance registered agent. According to Registered Agent Listings, hired registered agents typically charge an annual fee between $100 and $150 (as of 2010). Send marketing materials to businesses that explain your rates and services you offer.

Step 4

Apply for a job with a registered agent service company. Many law firms, accounting firms and business services companies employ people to act as a registered agent for their clients. You must meet the residency requirements for your state, but getting hired into an existing registered agent service company will let you avoid having to find office space or having to advertise your services.

Tips

  • When entrepreneurs start a corporation or limited liability company (LLC), they may act as their own registered agent provided they meet the state's requirements to be a registered agent (typically, the residency requirement). There is no fee associated with acting as your company's own registered agent. When filling out the creation documents for your business (articles of incorporation for corporations or articles of organization for LLCs), simply write in your name and address in the registered agent space to act as your company's registered agent.

About the Author

Based in Traverse City, Mich., George Lawrence has been writing professionally since 2009. His work primarily appears on various websites. An avid outdoorsman, Lawrence holds Bachelor of Arts degrees in both criminal justice and English from Michigan State University, as well as a Juris Doctor from the Thomas M. Cooley Law School, where he graduated with honors.