How to Set up a Home Fax Machine With a Wireless Router

by Patrick Phelps; Updated September 26, 2017

Many people who work from home rely on their fax machine to send documents to clients or their employees. Taking advantage of wireless home network technology, many fax machine manufacturers build wireless networking support into their fax machines. The benefits to a wireless network are many, and include a lack of extensive cabling as well as greater mobility. Setting up a fax machine to a wireless router can be accomplished in just a few steps.

Items you will need

  • Telephone cable
  • Telephone wall jack
  • Fax machine drivers
Step 1

Connect your fax machine. Fax machines still require a hard-wire connection to a telephone line. Connect a telephone cable from the wall jack to the "Line In" port on the back of the fax machine. Lift the handset to check for a dial tone.

Step 2

Connect to your wireless network. Most fax machines have a "Settings" button that, once pressed, will bring you into a menu area where many settings can be set. Scroll through the settings until you find "Network Settings." Press "Enter" to make changes to the network settings. The fax machine will find any wireless networks that are available. Select the network you want to connect to, enter the network password if required, then press "Enter." This will save your network settings. Your fax machine will connect to this network each time it is turned on.

Step 3

Load fax machine drivers. The drivers for your fax machine came with the machine when you purchase it. Install the CD and run the "install.exe" program. This will take you through several setup options and will load the required drivers onto your computer. If you do not have the installation CD, search for the appropriate drivers on the manufacturer's website.

Step 4

Send a test fax. Once installed, send a test fax to ensure that the connection and setup were done properly.

Tips

  • Make sure the fax machine has a strong wireless signal where it is placed. If the signal is weak, the fax machine may not connect to the wireless router and will not be able to be used.

About the Author

Patrick Phelps began writing professionally in 1996 and has completed writing projects for many businesses, including the University of Southern California, Richard Emmott Marketing in the U.K. and Rydax Systems. Phelps holds a Bachelors of Arts in English and business management from LeMoyne College and is continuing his education in business management at State University of New York, Saratoga Springs.