How to Become a General Contractor in the State of Kentucky

by Vance Holloman; Updated September 26, 2017
In Kentucky, all contractors in the state are required to obtain a business license.

As of 2010 there is no requirement for licensure as a general contractor in the state of Kentucky. However, several of the larger cities/counties do require that general contractors be licensed in their jurisdiction. Regardless of location, all contractors in the state are required to obtain a business license for the jurisdiction in which they are working.

Items you will need

  • Business license
  • Insurance
  • Application
  • Valid check
Step 1

Obtain the appropriate amount of worker's compensation and general liability insurance. Your local home builders association will be able to help you with this process.

Step 2

Obtain a copy of a business license application.

Step 3

Fill out the application, but do not sign it yet.

Step 4

Attach a check for the license fee. This will vary depending on the jurisdiction requiring the licensure. Amounts should be listed on the application.

Step 5

Fax or attach a copy of your worker's compensation and general liability insurance. Read the application for specific instructions in this area, as some jurisdictions require your insurer to fax or mail them proof of coverage.

Step 6

Notarize the application. You will need to sign the application in front of a notary. Be sure to have your driver's license available, as you will need to show it to the notary.

Step 7

Return the completed application and check, as well as any supporting documentation, to the address listed on the form.

Tips

  • If you wish to register as anything other than a sole proprietor you will need to incorporate and obtain a Federal Employer Identification Number prior to applying for general contractor and business licenses.

Warnings

  • You may not be able to purchase a business license until after you obtain your general contractor's license, as some jurisdictions will not issue a business license without a contractor's license.

    Even though you may have a business license for the jurisdiction in which you are based, you may need to acquire additional business licenses in other jurisdictions, if you choose to do business there.

About the Author

Vance Holloman is a residential contractor and freelance writer living in Atlanta. Much of his writing centers on the expertise he has gained from two decades in the construction industry. His work has appeared in newspapers, magazines and numerous online sites, including eHow.com and "Auburn Plainsman." Holloman has a Master's degree in business from the University of Maryland.

Photo Credits

  • contractor,foreman,construction image by Greg Pickens from Fotolia.com