How to Troubleshoot Panasonic Fax Machines

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Panasonic is one of the original manufacturers of the personal fax machines that exploded in popularity in the mid-1980s. The original devices used thermal paper. The devices then used ink film and plain paper to make images. These machines are still around. Problems with the Panasonic fax machines include issues with the initial settings; sending and receiving faxes; copying and paper jams. These issues can be troubleshot.

Verify that the Panasonic fax machine is plugged into a phone line jack if you can’t hear a dial tone when initially setting up the machine. Try a plain, analog phone on that line instead and see if you get a dial tone. Replace the phone line cord if you still don’t get a dial tone; the phone line cord may be broken internally.

Try copying the document you are trying to send if the receiving party complains that your fax is illegible. If you make a copy on the Panasonic machine and it looks good, you have confirmed that the scan function and the print function work fine. The problem may well be with the respondent’s fax machine.

Change the fax’s receiving mode from TEL to TAM/FAX or FAX ONLY if the other party reports that he can’t send you a fax. You can make these changes in the Menu area. TEL means that the fax machine is functioning as a telephone and not a fax.

Replace the ink film with a new one if the Panasonic fax machine won’t make a copy or received faxes look poor. Open the covers and remove the used core and used ink film. Remove the stoppers and tags from the new ink film, insert the ink film and close the covers.

Remove the paper tray first if paper jams. Don’t remove the jammed paper. Open the front cover by pulling up the center part. Open the back cover and then remove the jammed paper.

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About the Author

Patrick Nelson has been a professional writer since 1992. He was editor and publisher of the music industry trade publication "Producer Report" and has written for a number of technology blogs. Nelson studied design at Hornsey Art School.

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