How to Write a Standard Resume

by Peyton Brookes; Updated September 26, 2017

The standard resume provides the basic information necessary for an employer to request an interview. It combines simplicity and concise descriptions. The format includes basic subheads that highlight your skills, background and education. Depending on your career choice or current field, you can include multiple categories in a standard resume. Standard resumes also offer a minimalist and clean presentation through basic document formatting techniques. Submitting a cover letter in addition to a standard resume provides the opportunity to express your personality and additional job-related details.

Create a master list of your work experience, education, skills, achievements and volunteer work. Your master list will help you fill in each section, and you can use it when filling out job applications.

Open a word processing program and start a new blank document. You can also download a resume template by searching "resume templates" or "resume samples" online.

Insert your name at the top of the document. Use at least 14-point type to make your name stand out. Insert your contact information, including your address, telephone number and email address, immediately beneath your name. Select the block of text and center it on the page.

Press the "Enter" key twice and start a new section called "Objective." Write your career objective, describing your ideal work environment and position. Keep this section, and each subsequent section, left aligned on your page. Press the "Enter" key to start a new line.

Start a new section called "Experience" or "Professional Experience." Begin by listing your most recent job. Include the name and location of the employer, the dates you worked and your title. Start a new line after you enter each element. Enter a bullet list of your responsibilities for each employer. Keep your writing clear and concise. Continue entering your employment until you reach the past 10 years.

Enter a new section under "Experience" called "Education." List the name of your degree, the institution and the date your credential was awarded.

Tips

  • You can include additional information, such as unrelated experience, honors and awards, and a summary of your qualifications.

About the Author

Peyton Brookes is a workforce development expert and has written professionally about technology, education and science since 2009. She spent several years developing technology and finance courses for social programs in the Washington, D.C. area. She studied computer and information science at the University of Maryland College Park.

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