How to Fire a Property Manager

How to Fire a Property Manager. Are you a property owner fed up with your management staff? There are a wide variety of reasons for calling up a property management employee to the carpet, including tardiness, improper behavior, or possible embezzlement. But when you get to the end of your rope, and you want to send your second in command packing, there are a few things to think through to be sure the firing is handled in the best possible way.

Don't be hasty: before you break the news, you'll want to make sure you have a plan B. Do you have someone else ready to step up, or will you be able to handle the property yourself? If not, your firing might make things worse. Try to think it through before you go to the mat with your employee.

Get briefed. Another thing you'll want to do before dropping the bomb is looking over legal aspects and making sure your decision is completely in keeping not only with applicable labor laws but with the contract you may have signed when you hired the person. Consider any discrimination rules or clauses in the contract that prevent arbitrary firing.

Lay out the reasons for your decision. You'll want to have these on hand when you meet with your outgoing manager, and you may want to look them over yourself before making the final decision. What are the reasons? Are they professional issues or personal ones? Know your mind before you go spilling the beans about a staff change.

Call a meeting with your out-of-favor manager and negotiate something both of you can live with. Rather than send him packing with a blow of the gavel, try to iron out any possible issues, to be fair to your employee, and to protect yourself. You may want to designate a transition time, or other elements that will prevent a "leadership vacuum" at your properties.

Try to get resources for the newbie who will take over your properties. You may not be able to negotiate a training period: if the relationship between you and your property management employee ends in bad blood, your outgoing manager will not stand by and train someone. But making sure the keys, leases and other resources are available will help your new manager take over efficiently.

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