How to List Resume Skills for Working With Children

by Cynthia Measom - Updated September 26, 2017
Spend some time gathering information before creating your resume.

Whether you've worked with children in the past, or you've developed skills that are similar to those needed in child-related jobs, you can tailor the information on your resume to market yourself as a top job candidate. Even if you've never worked directly with children, you can describe your relevant skills to make you an attractive candidate for a position in which you'll interact with children.

Incorporating Skills into a Standard Resume

Make a list of all of the skills you've developed as a result of working with children, or abilities you possess that you think will be helpful when working with children. For instance, "Tutor 10- and 11-year-old children in math and reading," or, "Model appropriate social skills for mentally challenged adults." Write down skills that most closely match those needed in the jobs for which you're applying.

Create a section on your resume with a heading such as "Skills and Abilities," "Special Skills" or "Summary of Skills." Place this section either before or after your "Work Experience" section.

List the skills you compiled in Step 1 in bullet form underneath the "Skills" heading. If you have an extensive list, you may want to choose your top four or five points to avoid an imbalance of information on your resume.

Basic Skills Resume

List your personal information and an objective. The skill headings will follow and create the bulk of this type of resume.

Make a list of skill headings that will make you a good candidate for working with children, such as "Creative Thinking" or "Patience."

Write a skill statement under each heading to explain how the skill relates to your experience. For instance, under "Creative Thinking," you can write, "Ability to plan interesting and age-appropriate activities for children within minutes."

Tips

  • A basic skills resume works best when you have no formal job experience, but you've had experiences that make you a favorable candidate for working with children.

About the Author

Based in Texas, Cynthia Measom has been writing various parenting, business and finance and education articles since 2011. Her articles have appeared on websites such as The Bump and Motley Fool. Measom received a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Texas at Austin.

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