How to Be a Good Club President

by Kelsey Casselbury

A good club president can make or break an organization. When a club president is committed to the group, enthusiastic about its cause and supportive of its members, the club can thrive and succeed. On the other hand, a president who's secretive, negative and micromanaging can chase away potential members and cause the club to go under. After you're elected club president, take your role seriously and champion the club's cause with all your spirit.

Know Your Role

As the chief executive officer of the club, your primary purpose is to help the club and its members succeed in its mission. At your first club meeting, ask the members of the club how they view the president's role, and take that into consideration when leading the group. Keep a tab on any subcommittees that might form in the club, as well as the other club officers, but don't micromanage: Your role isn't to be the treasurer, social chair and volunteer coordinator, but rather to support them in their endeavors.

Learn the Bylaws

No one appreciates a club president who makes up rules and regulations according to his own whims. Take the time to learn the bylaws of the organization so you know how to effectively run the group. This will also give you the know-how on what to do if a member breaks a bylaw. At the same time, learn more about the history of the organization; members will likely come to you to learn more about the group's past.

Be Transparent

If the club president is secretive about the group's commitments, partnerships or finances, members might become suspicious or disillusioned with the club. At each club meeting, share a budgetary update with the group so everyone understands how the club is being financed and where any money it bring in -- such as dues -- is being used.

Be Inclusive and Enthused

If the club president isn't excited about the mission and activities of the club, no one else will be either. Part of your duties as club president is to keep a positive attitude and cheerlead the group's activities. Additionally, be inclusive of participants and welcome new members whenever possible. Listen to the ideas of the others in the group, even if they're not part of the leadership, and allow each member to feel as if he has a say in the group's commitments, mission and overall success.

About the Author

Kelsey Casselbury has a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from Penn State-University Park. She has a long career in print and web media, including serving as a managing editor for a monthly nutrition magazine and food editor for a Maryland lifestyle publication. She also owns an Etsy shop selling custom invitations and prints.

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